Each EV replacing an internal combustion engine vehicle will save an estimated 8,700 pounds of carbon dioxide annually. - Photo: Hawaii DOT

Each EV replacing an internal combustion engine vehicle will save an estimated 8,700 pounds of carbon dioxide annually.

Photo: Hawaii DOT

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) makes a step forward in electrification of its light-duty fleet with the arrival of the first electric vehicles (EVs) procured through the state’s EV as a service contract. The EV as a service contract allows HDOT and other interested state and county agencies to procure EVs and charging infrastructure on a per-mile cost basis, reducing the upfront costs of electrifying fleet vehicles. Use of this service contract is expected to save approximately 75% in vehicle maintenance over the lifespan of the vehicle and an average of $287 per vehicle per year in fuel costs.

On April 13, the first of nine EVs to serve as vehicle replacements was delivered to State Highways. One EV was picked up by the Hawaii State Energy Office (HSEO) through the contract as well. By the end of May, HDOT will replace an additional 34 internal combustion engine vehicles with EVs. Each EV replacing an internal combustion engine vehicle will save an estimated 8,700 lbs. of carbon dioxide annually. 

HDOT Highways will continue to pursue electrification or elimination of its light-duty fleet within the next seven years. The current light-duty fleet is made up of 300 vehicles statewide. The fleet conversion will be used as an opportunity to reevaluate the need for these vehicles. By 2028, HDOT Highways will either remove unnecessary internal combustion engine vehicles from the fleet entirely or replace them with EVs.

State and county agencies interested in learning more about the service contract or benefits of EV conversions can click here for cost comparisons and contact information.

Originally posted on Government Fleet

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