The new Goodyear SightLine tires use sensors that communicate with cloud-based algorithms. - Photo: Goodyear

The new Goodyear SightLine tires use sensors that communicate with cloud-based algorithms.

Photo: Goodyear

Intelligent tires that can talk in realtime with fleet operators are now a reality thanks to the latest development from Goodyear.

The new Goodyear SightLine tires use sensors that communicate with cloud-based algorithms. These provide predictive analysis of potential issues before they arise, offering improved uptime running and lower maintenance costs.

Launching first in both Europe and the US, the rubber company says that the techno-equipped tires will be available first for commercial vehicle use, such as fleets serving the field service, construction and last-mile delivery industries.

Phase two of the launch process will see the intelligent Goodyear SightLine tires made available to OE customers as well as fleets and mobility providers.

Chris Helsel, Senior Vice President, Global Operations and Chief Technology Officer, says:

"Much like smart watches that monitor vitals like heart rates and oxygen levels, Goodyear SightLine’s tire intelligence monitors the health of a tire. It takes the mystery out of understanding tires and provides proactive mobility insights to communicate when tires need service or replacement.”

Future development of the technology will allow reporting on road conditions, enabling connected, autonomous mobility. Additionally, they will also be able to optimise air pressure according to the road conditions to enhance safety with an inbuilt pump that raises or lowers pressures when required. They are primed to play a key role in mobility services and shared fleets thanks to the predictive technology.

Goodyear says the SightLine tires have been put through many millions of test miles before launch with initial results indicating that the cloud-connected tech can reduce stopping distance loss by 30%. The company plans to have tire intelligence in all new tires it sells by 2027.

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