Regulations regarding direct vision technology for trucks and buses and enlarged head impact zone on cars and vans will become effective in the future due to necessary structural design changes.  -  Photo: ACEA

Regulations regarding direct vision technology for trucks and buses and enlarged head impact zone on cars and vans will become effective in the future due to necessary structural design changes.

Photo: ACEA

The EU’s proposed General Safety Regulations, part of an effort to cut in half the number of traffic accident-caused fatal and serious injuries, are now mandatory.

The regulations, effective July 6, establish stricter new crash regulations and the latest safety technologies that now must be included as standard in new vehicle types in the EU.

These technologies include advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) such as:

  • Reversing detection
  • Emergency lane keeping systems
  • Advanced emergency braking
  • Intelligent speed assistance
  • Emergency stop signal
  • Driver drowsiness and attention warning
  • Event data recorders, providing future support accident research

In addition, commercial vehicles will include:

  • Pedestrian and cyclist collision warning
  • Blind spot information
  • Direct vision for drivers to spot other road users
  • Tire pressure monitoring

Several of these safety systems are already widely available and in use today, but now will come standard in all new vehicle types, with further improvements, accordint to the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), which issued a statement this week “welcoming the entry into force of the GSR.”

Regulations regarding direct vision technology for trucks and buses and enlarged head impact zone on cars and vans will become effective in the future due to necessary structural design changes.

The ACEA pointed out, “Vehicle technology however is not the only way to reduce road casualties. It must be combined with safer driver behavior, better enforcement of existing traffic rules and, very importantly, improved road infrastructure.”

First proposed as part of the EU’s 3rd Mobility Package in May 2018, the regulations were approved in 2019. The EU estimates its new vehicle regulations will save more than 25,000 lives and avoid at least 140,000 serious injuries by 2038.

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