In the UK, the average cost of a public charging session rose by 19% during the last quarter.  -  Photo: Gustavo Fring

In the UK, the average cost of a public charging session rose by 19% during the last quarter.

Photo: Gustavo Fring

Company car drivers in electric cars are facing price confusion as they encounter a bewildering choice of charging prices and charging rates in the UK.

The situation has been exacerbated by the rise in wholesale electricity prices.

Mina, an EV charge payment solutions provider, says the average cost of a public charging session had risen by 19% during the last quarter to 67p per kWh following analysis of 32,500 real life-charging events.

The lowest price it found (excluding free sessions at supermarkets) was 36p, while the most expensive was £2.77 – although this included parking charges in the price.

The result is a confusing menu of prices and charging speeds, says Mina.

MIna CEO Ashley Tate: "Sometimes drivers are happy to pay a high rate if they can access lots of energy and be on their way quickly to get on with their day, while at others, they want to pay less and take their time.”  -  Photo: Mina

MIna CEO Ashley Tate: "Sometimes drivers are happy to pay a high rate if they can access lots of energy and be on their way quickly to get on with their day, while at others, they want to pay less and take their time.”

Photo: Mina

“Choice is hugely important for company car drivers, because our data shows they use chargers in very different ways. Sometimes drivers are happy to pay a high rate if they can access lots of energy and be on their way quickly to get on with their day, while at others, they want to pay less and take their time,” said Mina CEO Ashley Tate. 

“So when it comes to putting in expenses, and then justifying to their employers why they used particular more costly chargers, or spent so much time stopped, things can get awkward. The choices you make around charging your car for business shouldn’t require constant explanations to your employer.”

Since the report was compiled, the situation has changed again, with providers such as Osprey reducing the cost to 79p per kWh thanks to the UK government’s Energy Bill Relief Scheme to subsidize the wholesale cost of electricity for energy suppliers.

Meanwhile supermarket Tesco, which has supplied EV chargers in its car parks in conjunction with Volkswagen and Pod Point, has introduced a charge of 7p per kWh for its 7kW chargers, which were previously free to access.

Despite these changes in prices, drivers in EVs are still better off financially when compared with petrol or diesel vehicles, Mina adds. According to its data, the average driver uses public chargers to add around 90 miles of charge, to help them get to a destination rather than plugging into them for a full charge.

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