-  Photo: Kendel Media

Photo: Kendel Media

The lack of on-site electric charger provision by companies electrifying their fleets has been identified in a report by leasing and mobility provider Arval U.K.

Research from the company’s Mobility Observatory Report has identified a gap in fleet electrification plans around provision of on-site chargers in the UK.

The report found that one third of enterprises that had electrified their fleets - or were preparing to do so - lacked facilities for drivers to charge at work.

Asked about arrangements for company car and van charging provision, the responses indicated that 33% had no charging points at their premises, although 17% said they planned to install facilities within the next 12 months.

“We’re at a stage in the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) where companies are still in the process of aligning the cars and vans they operate with their charging needs, and the third who don’t yet provide charging at their premises may be experiencing some operational difficulties as a result,” commented Shaun Sadlier, head of Arval Mobility Observatory in the UK.

Head of Arval Mobility Observatory UK Shaun Sadlier:  “Within a relatively short period of time, it’s likely that all businesses operating vehicles which have their own parking will offer charging."  -  Photo: Arval UK

Head of Arval Mobility Observatory UK Shaun Sadlier:  “Within a relatively short period of time, it’s likely that all businesses operating vehicles which have their own parking will offer charging."

Photo: Arval UK

“Within a relatively short period of time, it’s likely that all businesses operating vehicles which have their own parking will offer charging and the 17% who aim to do this within the next year indicate this shift is underway. Within a relatively short space of time – perhaps two to three years – we expect this kind of provision to become commonplace.”

While most companies that provided employee onsite charging did so for free, the report’s authors suggested that may change as electrification becomes more widespread and the cost of electricity rapidly increases.

However, ChargedEV - a chargepoint provider - said current charger provisions may not be suitable long term, “with stop gap measures installed as a first step,” according to business founder Mark Pymm.

ChargedEV said that without detailed examination of a fleet’s requirements, efficiencies could be missed.

“The need for thorough fleet analysis is crucial for ensuring a successful and future-proofed infrastructure installation. If a fleet's total charging needs are not understood through telematics data, then they can never be successfully met. While the provision of some basic charging points can feel like a box ticked, it’s likely that companies will be sleepwalking into higher costs and problems further down the road,” he warned.

In the UK, fleet provision of electric vehicles continued to forge ahead, thanks to generous tax incentives, helping EVs reach over 16% of market share and overtaking diesel cars for the first time.

0 Comments